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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Foreign direct investment in Sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Foreign direct investment in Sub-Saharan Africa

Laurence Cockcroft

Foreign direct investment in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Laurence Cockcroft

  • 280 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by International Economics Dept., World Bank in Washington, D.C. (1818 H St. NW Washington 20433) .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan.
    • Subjects:
    • Investments, Foreign -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementLaurence Cockcroft and Roger C. Riddell.
      SeriesPolicy, research, and external affairs working papers ;, WPS 6 19
      ContributionsRiddell, Roger.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHG5822 .C63 1991
      The Physical Object
      Pagination71 p. :
      Number of Pages71
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1033940M
      LC Control Number93228106

      This paper analyzes the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries for which relevant macroeconomic data Author: Yemane Michael. Books; Briefs; Working Papers; LIBRARY. Databases; e-Journal Access; Services; Catalogue Search; Foreign direct investment in sub-Saharan Africa: Beyond its growth effect. Hassen Wako #This study relates Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to economic growth, institutional quality and manufacturing value added. To this end, it uses dynamic.

      Foreign Direct investment, domestic investment, and economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa. Samuel Adams. Journal of Policy Modeling, , vol. 31, issue 6, Abstract: The study analyzes the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) and domestic investment (DI) on economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa for the period The results show that DI is Cited by: Asiedu, E. () “Foreign Direct Investment in Africa: The Role of Natural Resources, Market Size, Government Policy, Institutions and Political Instability”. World Economy, 29(1): 63– CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 6.

        Abstract This article investigates the effect of infrastructure and foreign direct investment (FDI) on economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) using panel data on 46 countries covering the period – The data were analyzed using fixed effects, random effects, and system generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation : Edward Nketiah-Amponsah, Bernard Sarpong. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is an important source of financing development. It enhances efficiency and raises skills of local manpower, facilitates transfer of technology, generates employment and promotes productivity resulting in broad welfare.


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Foreign direct investment in Sub-Saharan Africa by Laurence Cockcroft Download PDF EPUB FB2

Winkler is theeditor of Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa: LocalSpillovers and Competitiveness in Global Value Chains (with Thomas Farole).

Herrecent articles have appeared in World Development, Journal of EconomicGeography, and World Economy, as well as edited volumes by the World BankGroup, 5/5(1). Last month, EY, released the Africa Attractiveness report which describes trends and opportunities in Africa’s economic growth and in foreign direct : Payce Madden.

Foreign direct investment in sub-Saharan Africa (English) Abstract. The authors of this paper examine trends in private foreign direct investment in sub - Saharan Africa, assess how this has affected the host economies, and discuss the prospects for increased investment Cited by: Foreign direct investment (FDI) is becoming increasingly critical to the economies of developing countries, in part due to a major expansion in the scope of global value chains (GVCs), whereby lead firms outsource parts of their production and services activities across complex international networks.

See More + The key messages in this brief are as follows: 1) Foreign direct investment (FDI) remains one of the most important forms of cross-border capital flow into developing countries.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, where countries tend to have liberal policies favouring inward flows, FDI has grown nearly sixfold over the past decade. the world. In sub-Saharan Africa, almost all FDI in the form of M&As takes place in South Africa.

It is reported that approximately 60% of inward investment in South Africa takes the form of mergers and acquisitions. A recent KPMG study revealed that South Africa recorded a total of US$ bn of cross border inward and outward M&As since June File Size: 77KB.

Foreign direct investment (FDI) in sub-Saharan Africa is on the rise, with the continent’s share of global FDI projects at its highest level in a decade, and sharply improved perceptions making it the second-most attractive investment destination in the world, according to Ernst & Young’s Africa Attractiveness Survey.

Consequently, the use of a large data set of 42 Sub-Saharan African countries will help to better explain the impact of FDI on economic growth in SSA. Finally, the study examined the effect of FDI on domestic investment to examine whether FDI crowds in or crowds out domestic by:   Other countries which have received significant foreign investment include Ghana, Uganda and Zambia.

FDI trends differ significantly between North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa. As a result of ongoing political uncertainty in the region, FDI projects in North Africa declined by almost 30% as a whole.

2— A lack of infrastructure and volatile regulation is often blamed for stymying foreign direct investment into least developed countries (LDCs), the majority (34) of which are found in sub-Saharan Africa, but flows into these countries increased 4% to $23 billion, helping raise Africa’s still-low but improved % share of world FDI.

Foreign Direct Investments – FDI Flows – to Africa rose by 11 per cent to $46 billion in the past year, and ina number of factors, including the the realisation of African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement (AfCFTA) could support additional flows.

Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa Local Spillovers and Competitiveness in Global Value Chains Thomas Farole and Deborah Winkler, Editors foreign FDI spillovers GVC linkages domestic apparelAfrica chains potential productivity mining agribusiness manufacturing support investors absorptive mediating technology capacity File Size: 4MB.

This book presents the results of a groundbreaking study on spillovers of knowledge and technology from global value-chain oriented foreign direct investment (FDI) in Sub-Saharan Africa, and discusses implications for policymakers hoping to harness the power of FDI for economic development.

In contrast to previous studies on the relationship between trade openness and FDI inflows, this study develops a new measure of trade openness.

Principal component analysis was employed to generate an index to capture trade policy openness. The. The project tested the effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on poverty in two different ways in a number of countries in East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

First, we identified effects on the demand for skilled and unskilled labour, hence the potential direct effect on reducing poverty. Downloadable. This study relates Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) to economic growth, institutional quality and manufacturing value added.

To this end, it uses dynamic panel data techniques that allow for parameter heterogeneity and possible non-stationarity in the series. The results confirm that economic growth, institutional quality, and natural resources, each play a Author: Hassen Abda Wako.

Foreign direct investment, net inflows (BoP, current US$) - Sub-Saharan Africa International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments database, supplemented by data from the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and official national sources.

Foreign direct investment, net inflows (% of GDP) - Sub-Saharan Africa International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics and Balance of Payments databases, World Bank, International Debt Statistics, and World Bank and OECD GDP estimates.

Foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows to Africa as a whole remained stable at $54 billion inwith decreases in North Africa being offset by rises in Sub-Saharan Africa, UNCTAD's World Investment Report 1 has revealed. North Africa saw its FDI flows decline by 15 per cent to $ billion. This study has made an attempt to investigate and analyze empirically the impact of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on the economic growth for.

Sub-Saharan Africa foreign direct investment for was $B, a % decline from Sub-Saharan Africa foreign direct investment for was $B, a % decline from Sub-Saharan Africa foreign direct investment for was $B, a % decline from In the past couple of decades foreign direct investment (FDI) has become the most important source of external finance in developing countries, particularly those in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

The importance of this source of external finance is evident in the efforts by many SSAFile Size: 1MB.East Africa received $ billion in FDI inup 13 per cent from Flows to Ethiopia rose by 46 per cent to $ billion, propelled by investments in infrastructure and manufacturing.

FDI flows to West Africa grew by 12 per cent to $ billion insupported by recovering investment in Nigeria.